Silken pottery

It’s been quiet on here the past week or so, and that’s because I’ve been on a bit of a mission and something had to give. Turns out it was this space which I love, but now the mission is mostly accomplished I’m expecting to catch up with myself, or a least a bit more than i have recently. The mission - more on that on Monday, as it really is quite dull - involved photos and this post is as a direct result of some of the photos I’ve rediscovered.

Some like these, I intended to share here but somehow never got around to it, and others I’ve wondered why I’ve kept, if not why i even took in the first place. But that’s the joys of digital photography, I guess, though I’m pretty sure I’ve some actual photos that fit into the same category!

But anyway, back to today’s post. These photos are shamefully from 2016 and my visit to the London Design Festival, and they are amazing. Well, not the photos, the content.

fragments of pottery covered in silk and sewn together to create pieces of art

They are fragments of pottery covered in silk, and then put together again to reform the original item, or part of the item. And they are exquisite.

brightly coloured materials, exquisite craftwork and a beautiful result

It’s not so obvious with the items above, but the photo below shows the amount of work, and very neat stitching, to cover each fragment. The items fit together again so well, as they’re broken specially to create these beautiful pieces.

An exquisitely created and decorative bowl
the bowl side on
pale lilac flowers and patterned material mixed together

I know that I was totally mesmerised by these, and we spent quite a while speaking to the creator of these. Sadly though, along the way and over the years, I’ve mislaid (or not found again yet) the details of the maker. I wish I had them to hand, because all this time on I still think they’re great, and knowing this now, I’d happily part with some cash (and no doubt a fair amount of it) to own one of these.

Love This #73: Sandberg's Swedish Wallpaper Art

It's been a while since the London Design Festival took place, and this year I headed over to the London Design Fair in creative heart of East London. The fair included what has previously been known as Tent London and Super Brands London and was held in the Old Truman Brewery. The building itself is fascinating and I'm sure you'll spot it in future posts, and it's likely it will have its own post too. 

But before we get to that I want to share more about this Swedish wallpaper company, who I saw quite early on. But I was so keen on one of their wallpapers that I carried a sample of it around for the rest of the day. MOH was worried I think because he could see how taken with it I was, and because he knew we had nowhere suitable for it. I knew that too, but I also knew I wasn't leaving without a sample, even if I'm banking the wallpaper for a future project and house.

But it was this wallpaper that caught my eye and drew me over to the Sandberg stand.

SANDBERG SIGNATUR WALLPAPER: VÅRA VISOR

SANDBERG SIGNATUR WALLPAPER: VÅRA VISOR

The yellow version of the wallpaper inspired by the songbook ”Våra visor” with the sort of pattern that the more you look at, the more you see. MOH wasn't keen on this one, but I could see this working in either a child's room or a playful part of the house. 

While looking at the yellow and grey Våra visor I couldn't help but notice the wallpaper that captured my heart, and that's this striking and boldly patterned wallpaper. While it has yellow in it, I wouldn't look at this and say it's yellow and that troubled me, as I rarely go for blue. The lady said it came in a yellow colourway and briefly wondered which room we'd redecorate to accommodate it. 

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR BLUE 

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR BLUE 

But when I found the yellow version I was disappointed, it was more lemon than bold yellow as I'd hoped and the plans to redecorate where immediately shelved. There's a red version which was back in the bold range, but not for me. Which left the blue which had caught my attention, and that I was unable to stop looking at.

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR YELLOW

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR YELLOW

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR RED

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR RED

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR BLUE

SANDBERG WALLPAPER: TISTLAR BLUE

I've decided that for me the pattern is thistles and that's some of the attraction, along with the bold lines and colours. I've since read that the lines have been softened, and more worryingly that the blue is also available in a fabric. At the moment, having this somewhere at some point is inevitable, but I just don't know when or where.

I'm hoping that the sample which I left clutching goes some way to fill the need for this pattern, that I didn't know existed. That's not going to wallpaper me anything, it might just about cover a book - remember those days when you used to cover your schoolbooks in wallpaper? - yes, me too.  I do have a plan for it and that's as part of a craft project that's underway at the moment. My challenge there is to use enough of the wallpaper to capture the elements I like, but to save enough so I'm not without it. 

Although I guess I could send for another sample if it comes to it. 

When I looked at the Sandberg site to check the names of the wallpapers I've shown here I found myself browsing the site and finding lots more boldly patterned wallpapers and some more subtle ones too. But the thing that I liked the most was the Sandberg wallpaper personality quiz.

I've taken it twice now, on different days, and both times it's made me a Nowstalgic, and both times the Tistlar wallpaper has been shown in the results (admittedly the red version) but that confirms my feeling of inevitability, doesn't it?

Apparently as a Nowstalgic I love "products and patterns that have stood the test of time" and enjoy exploring new techniques that fit in with "relaxed and aged style of the home." That feels right, it also says that auction sites and flea markets are a favourite, that's not so true. But it is true that items featuring favourite colours become must-haves, and the bit about mixing my finds with teak furniture is also partly true. Of course, it's quite general but at least some of it rang true.  

What's your wallpaper personality type?  Take the quiz and let me know in the comments.

New Prints and Jacquards from Prestigious Textiles for Autumn/Winter

It's been a couple of weeks now since I visited Prestigious Textiles at their stand in the Hilton at Syon Park as part of the London Design Festival to see their Autumn/Winter ranges. I liked the ranges I saw then and I still do. I took pictures of my own on the day but they don't compare to the official images for each range, so I'm using those instead in this post - and I'm sure you'll agree they are just gorgeous!

There's florals, bold patterns, silks, velours, rich palettes, some with a scandi-type feel as well as pastels and brights - so there really is something for everyone. I saw the first six ranges I'm showing below, and the seventh is one that I've a feeling will do well and has brought a furnishing favourite bang up to date, so let's get going...

1. Eclipse

This range is full of sumptuous deep pinks which are set off by just a little bit of shimmer. But it's not all pinks as the browns and earthy green and blue ensure it's not too girly. My favourite fabric in this range is shown best in the third photograph, the shimmering brown with the textured stripes looked great, and it was the one fabric I found myself holding onto as we talked about the range.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

2. Mardi Gras

This whole range is fresh and colourful and it's quite fun too. I loved the paisley design shown on the chairs below - and just had to include this photo as isn't the room gorgeous? There's definitely a hint of tropical rainforest in this range and with its butterfly fabric - there's also a macaw fabric - it's fun too, and while this would look good in a breakfast room I don't think it needs to be restricted to there, as the photos show.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

3. Grand Palais

This range is full of rich and detailed patterns that somehow are moody (in a good way) too! There's embroidered linens - just look at the cushion in the second photo, large checks, embellished bands and digitally-printed velvets all in jewel like colours.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

And well I just had to share the pretty bike photo, didn't I?

4. Cube

This range has strong geometric and modern designs which I think work well on the printed cotton. Spots, zigzags, hexagons and 3D cubes used alone or together mean this is a range that I think will make a big impact wherever it's used. My favourite in this range is the hexagon pattern shown in the second photo - such a simple pattern, but so effective - and for me one that could be used in almost any home alongside  existing furnishings.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

5. Safari

 I liked this range too, for me it's the luxurious look and that shimmer. There's contrasts too with crisp embroidered satins alongside foil-printed velvets. I am rather partial to the greens in this range, I find them calming and elegant and for me the range brings a contemporary touch to traditional.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

6. Java

 I love this range, I think it's very liveable - the brochure says exuberant and I think that's right. It's fun and there's Scandi-like hints here too for me and I think this has the potential to be a very versatile range. And I love the idea of a tablecloth and coordinating napkins. I think the patterns bring an informality and funky vibe and this is a fabric I can see myself using. In fact, I've got a couple of things in mind already.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

7. Velour

This is the range that I think brings an old furnishing favourite up to date. I mean there's 35 colours in this range - yes 35! And it seems a far cry from the drab velour I have memories of. I remember mum recovering our sofa a very long time ago with a mink brown velour, just imagine what she could have done with these instead!

And yes, why stop at one colour with so many to choose from - and you know what, those clever people at Prestigious Textiles have ensured they match the other ranges, so there really is no limit to what you can do.

Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles
Photo credit: Prestigious Textiles

Spending a rainy afternoon looking at fabrics was great fun and left feeling totally inspired. Thank you to everyone I met at Prestigious Textiles for showing me the ranges and explaining how the ranges come together. And watch this space for some of the craft projects I have in mind, I told you I left feeling inspired...

Of the ones I've featured here, I think the Java range is the most useable here, but you may have already picked up on that. It's hard though to choose a favourite overall as each could be used in so many ways, but I'm interested to know which range appeals to you - let me know in the comments.

This is a collaborative post with Prestigious Textiles, however all words and opinions are my own.

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