Fabulous outdoor planters (and more) from Cox & Cox

Now that the evenings are getting lighter (yay!) and Spring bulbs are bringing colour to parks and gardens, I'm starting to be tempted out into the garden again. I've shared the plans I have for our allotment and my seed order is being finalised, but what about my garden?

I've mentioned before that our garden is a mature one, with lots of shrubs and so it's predominantly green. The challenge I have is to introduce colour to keep MOH from wanting to rip the whole garden out and start again. But because the trees and shrubs are large traditional bedding plants aren't always that successful, and let's be honest sometimes they have that municipal feel, don't they?

I've found though that pots are a great way to introduce colour, as not only can you control the soil (and not dig into a tree root) grouped together they can bring height and interest into the garden. 

And the pots don't have to be boring either. Just look at these, which are just a selection of the new range from Cox and Cox:
 BIRCH EFFECT PLANTERS, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

BIRCH EFFECT PLANTERS, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

 RUSTY NESTING PLANTERS, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

RUSTY NESTING PLANTERS, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

The three above aren't quite what they seem either. They're not stone as you might think, but fibreglass so they'll be easy to move around the garden, even when they're planted. The finish of these emulates silver birch, and I like the texture and age that gives. 

 GALVANISED FLUTED TROUGH, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

GALVANISED FLUTED TROUGH, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

Or there's the rusty planters, aren't they a gorgeous colour? For me they also prove that a simple design is a winner too. 

Troughs to edge a path

I have a small path alongside my greenhouse and I've been on the lookout for some low-level planters to help soften the edges of greenhouse. But I don't want something so big that it blocks the light to my seeds and plants busily trying to grow in there. 

My plan is to grow herbs here so when I brush past I'll catch their scent. Again I'm drawn to the simple design of this zinc trough. They'd look equally good with cheery spring bulbs in too, and as window boxes.

 

 AGED ZINC MILK CHURN, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

AGED ZINC MILK CHURN, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

Definitely not boring

Remember that I said your planters didn't need to be boring?

Well, how about a milk churn - I think it'd look great with some cheery daffodils sprouting from the top.

It'd certainly bring a smile to my face.  Although it's too late to plant Spring bulbs now - usually I plant mine in the autumn using the lasagne approach - it's not too late to add some Spring colour to your garden.  

You can pick up ready grown bulbs relatively cheaply in the supermarkets and garden centres. My bargain hyacinth last week cost just £1.49.

Or you could think a little further ahead and plan some fabulous summer displays. 

 

 AGED METAL BIRD CAGES, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

AGED METAL BIRD CAGES, PHOTO CREDIT COX & COX

And just because... 

I couldn't resist sharing these metal bird cages, while they're not planters as such they're definitely on my wish list. I know though I'll have a job to convince MOH we need them.  

Sigh.  

His argument, after the what are we going to do with those, would be where would we put them? And he'd have a point. I'd love to say in the conservatory, and to have that kind of conservatory. You know the airy sort that you see in stately homes?

Our conservatory has a little way to go - we're currently using ours as a bike store and general dumping area, so it's a campaign I'll leave until I'm on stronger ground. 

But who knows, maybe one day...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Bit Of Everything


This is is a collaborative post with Cox and Cox, but all opinions are my own