Reflecting on my week #58

After a gallivanting about for the past few weekends, it was good to have some time at home. The week was pretty ordinary, and alongside catching up on some chores and actually getting out into the garden to tackle the leaf situation, for a change our Saturday night wasn’t in front of the TV.  We were off out in Greenwich, to the launch party of a new venue at the university.  It was a great night, with the venue living up to its billing - the words below are some of the wall art, and the party took place in the basement.  Enough said.

Getting ready though I realised I’d accumulated quite a few bits of green costume jewellery, which as they’re all a complimentary shade accessorised my outfit fantastically well - I’m not sure how I’ve not noticed how they well they go together before...

Accumulating 'green' jewellery including a ring, bracelet and brooch
the lower the sea level the greater the party

It reminded me of a time talking to a friend and commuter companion back when the train into town was my commute. She noticed I was wearing a string of beads, commented that she only ever wore gold or silver and then delivered the backhanded complement that costume suited me though. To this day, I’m still not quite sure how to take it. I’m certain though, that I’m not quite so rigid in my thinking.  

We didn’t quite get as many of the chores done as we might, as I spent the morning in the hairdressers and MOH was unusually out of sorts, and enjoyed some time just being while I was out. I’ve often said time to just be is important, but it’s not often he takes that advice. I know he’s had a busy time of late, and was complaining of a bad leg - it must be hurting a fair bit as he was contemplating making a doctors appointment.  Clearly that’s not the same as actually doing it, or even going, but for it to be considered... That’s passed now as he’s convinced it’s improving, but briefly there I thought it might actually result in an appointment.

My hair appointment was equally as dramatic, and quite colourful.  I was back getting the greys covered, and have been way bolder than I’ve been before. The plan was to have some red added in below the top layer of my hair on the longer side of my bob, except that the red is pink, and quite a bright one at that, which I’m still getting used to.  

I’d thought that it would be duller after taking my natural hair colour into consideration and hadn’t realised that first this section of my hair would be bleached, so the colour was just as it was in the chart.  But in fairness, that’s what I signed up to - and it does look great, I’m just at that stage where I’m surprising myself each time I look in the mirror.  And this is just an underneath layer, not the whole head, I’m sure as I settle into it, it’ll be fine.  I like how it’s done - but at the moment I’m missing the red I was anticipating, and rather like. 

Looking back at the photos I’ve taken this week, this one stood out for me. Not only because of my brolly (which changes colour when wet), but also because of the colour of the leaves in Greenwich Park, on my way to work one morning.  

rain and autumn leaves in greenwich park

So vibrant aren’t they? 

the grass in our garden is covered with leaves

Compare that to the photo above, which is from our back garden. There’s grass under there somewhere, not that you’d know it, but it was found and our garden more resembles the one we know after a good few hours from MOH reclaiming the lawn...!

A garden robin

Another sculpture from one of the stands at this year’s Chelsea, and one that many of us could recreate for real in our own gardens, with our own friendly robin and spade. We have a couple of robins in our garden which I’m told is unusual as they’re territorial. But even so, they’re inquisitive and friendly, or just after the worms and insects where we’re working.

This sculpture is one by Rupert Till whose wire sculptures are just stunning, and something I’d be happy to incorporate into a garden. Some are quite large, on his website you’ll see a racehorse jumping a fence, which would be quite hard to accommodate in a domestic garden, but the smaller sculptures should be easier.

What do you think?

A wire robin on a spade by Robert Till

Visiting the four RHS Gardens this year

This year is my second year as a member of the RHS, and at the start of the year I wondered if I could manage to visit all four of their gardens. Some, I knew would be easier than others. Living in London, getting to Wisley in Surrey and Hyde Hall in Essex are relatively easy and are the gardens I’ve been to most.

The other two, Harlow Carr in Yorkshire and Rosemoor in Devon, I’d never been to, but with relatives in Devon I thought this was do-able. We were in Devon in March and it was on our ‘to visit’ list but our visit was cut short when the snow started to come in. We knew we’d be back later in the year, and so my plan was to sneak in a visit then. That was last weekend and even though the forecast was rain, we made it happen.

Though if we’d not made it to Harlow Carr, made possible by a tactical UK break, then maybe we’d have left it for another year. I’m glad we didn’t though as it’s nice to meet the challenges we set ourselves, even if visiting each of the RHS gardens in a year isn’t the most strenuous of challenges!

RHS Wisley

Wisley in Surrey is the RHS’ historic home and the RHS garden I’ve visited the most. The hot houses are always a favourite spot in January and February, as not only are they warm but they’re full of butterflies and exotic plants. Other usual haunts are the alpine houses and the vegetable garden, and I’m continually amazed by the Bonsai too.

RHS Hyde Hall

I’ve only been to this garden a few times, despite the fact that it’s only in Essex but each time it’s been full of sculptures. They’ve had some building work done and it was great to see the new visitor centre and cafe open on my last visit. And I finally got into the new vegetable garden, which opened a week after my previous visit, bad timing or what?

 EXQUISITE FLOWERS

EXQUISITE FLOWERS

 THE DRY GARDEN

THE DRY GARDEN

RHS Harlow Carr

My first visit was in July during our week in Yorkshire, and as you can tell from the photos we had great weather. I realised while creating this post that I’ve not shared much from there yet, but on the plus side there’s some sunny posts to look forward to over the winter.

 THE STREAMSIDE WALK

THE STREAMSIDE WALK

 INSECTS IN THE BORDERS

INSECTS IN THE BORDERS

 JUST STUNNING

JUST STUNNING

RHS Rosemoor

The final garden and the last one I visited, after an aborted attempt much earlier in the year. I’m not sure why we haven’t been before when we head down to Devon normally at least once a year. It’s a place we’ll be going to again, and while it was full of autumn colours on our visit it’ll be great to see it in a different season to see how the garden changes.

 AUTUMN COLOURS

AUTUMN COLOURS

 MEDLARS

MEDLARS

 THE HOBBIT HOUSE

THE HOBBIT HOUSE

So there’s a selection of photos from each of the four gardens, I’m not sure I’ll manage to get to them all again next year - but you never know. And then in 2020 the challenge increases as the new RHS garden in Manchester is due to open, now that I’ll be keen to see.

Have you been to any of these RHS gardens, or more than one?