Behind the ornate gate in Greenwich Park

It was back in January that I first spotted the ornate gate of the Queen's Orchard, and it's taken me a while to step inside. But finally, some several months later I've managed it, and I wasn't disappointed. We were out in Greenwich this Saturday for a lazy brunch, treating ourselves after the events of last week, and generally having a mooch around. 

The main entrance to Greenwich Park was shut and so as we headed home we aimed for the Park Row gate, and then I remembered that the Queen's Orchard might be open. So off we went to check. And it was. 

And I wasn't disappointed.  The first section of the long thin space is the most bountiful vegetable growing space.

Stepping inside the ornate gate of the queens orchard

Much more plentiful than my allotment. And don't even mention the onions.

Someone's had more onion success than me

Yes indeed.

After the raised beds we reached a pond, with this stripey pond grass screening it off nicely. 

Striped grass edging the pond

It wasn't until we were at its side that we were able to appreciate it fully. And it really was as tranquil as it looked, despite the children's playground being just behind us. What a view those houses must get though...

Benches around the pond and what a view those houses have

I suspect there's also a micro-climate within those walls, as not only is the veg better than my allotment, their agapanthus are already in flower too. Mine are just starting to flower.  My sunflowers are a long way behind these, 

AGAPANTHUS

AGAPANTHUS

SUNFLOWERS TOO

SUNFLOWERS TOO

 My sunflowers are a long way behind these, but even so they're still a plant which make me smile.  I picked up some tips for securing my hoops - cable ties - I think that might just work, and make our tunnels sturdier than we've managed before. 

CABBAGES

CABBAGES

A LADDER FIT FOR AN ORCHARD

A LADDER FIT FOR AN ORCHARD

The ladders along the walls intrigued me to start with, mainly for their shape. Until I remembered that this was an orchard and so a ladder shaped this way would be much easier to use, and less likely to damage any fruit. Clever hey? 

After the pond the area was much different - it actually looks more like my allotment that the vegetable growing section did - and the path gently encouraged us around the orchard. Just by the entrance there was a plan detailing all of the trees, something we checked on our way out and were pleased to learn that we'd correctly spotted a mulberry tree. 

LED AROUND THE GARDEN BY THE WINDING PATH

LED AROUND THE GARDEN BY THE WINDING PATH

A MULBERRY TREE

A MULBERRY TREE

I was quite taken with the wild flowers finding them particularly photogenic. 

STOPPING TO ADMIRE TEH WILDFLOWERS IN THE ORCHARD IN GREENWICH PARK

And then in a fenced area we saw three bee hives, and its residents were evident throughout the garden, especially as we discovered in the lavender.

FENCED OFF BEEHIVES IN THE QUEENS ORCHARD IN GREENWICH PARK

And if you were a bee, wouldn't this just be heaven?

LAVENDER EDGING THE GRAVEL PATH, UNSURPRISINGLY IT WAS FULL OF BEES

I've photos with bees throughout the lavender, and with the sweet peas flanking the other side of the path I bet the honey from these bees is great.  We have the everlasting kind of sweet peas in our garden and they are great - easy too - but always pink. Seeing the jewel like colours always makes me stop and wonder.

PRETTY - AND FRAGRANT - SWEET PEAS
 
ALLIUM HEADS AGAINST THE LAVENDER

Just one last photo, because I couldn't resist. Lavender, gravel and allium heads - gorgeous isn't it?  And a very special place, and one that now I've discovered is likely to become a favourite.  

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